Computers Computer Networking

How To Change An Administrator Network Password

Introduction

PC users should think of their network like it is the Windows operating system. Most homes use a router to create a local area network. This hardware device has its own software that it uses to manage the connection. You can actually log into this router's software much like you log into your Windows user account, with a username and password.

However, in the case of your network, anyone who accesses the router should be an administrator. Sometimes households have multiple users who are sharing the Internet, via the router, and it is not safe to allow any and everyone have access to the settings within the router. The most obvious reason why administrators should be the only ones accessing routers is that no one wants the Internet to become unstable as they are working on an important project or simply viewing videos via YouTube, for example.

Another more pressing reason to restrict has administrator access to the router is to prevent security breaches from unauthorized users. Many homes have gone wireless. If another user can detect your Wi-Fi broadcast, they could hack your connection.

If you feel the network's administrator password has been compromised you can change it following a few basic steps.

Step 1

Connect an Ethernet cable between your computer and the router. If you currently connect to the network via a wireless connection, you will want too temporarily cease using this connection. When you access the administrator network settings and change the password, your router might automatically power down and restart, breaking your connection to the network. The router will also restart while you are connected via Ethernet cable, but your computer and the router will quickly reestablish a connection.

Step 2

Open the installed Internet browser on your computer that is connected to the router, such as Firefox, Chrome or Internet Explorer. The browser will serve as what is sometimes called the web-based interface to the administrator network settings and menu on the router.

Step 3

Type the router's Internet protocol address in the bar in the browser. For example, some routers use the following address: 192.168.1.1. Other router brands use some variation of 192.168.XXX.XXX.

Consult your router's instruction manual for the exact address that provides access to the administrator's network menu.

Step 4

Press the Enter key after typing in the router's IP address that grants access to the administrator network options. You should see a box that prompts you for the default or existing user generated username and password. For many router brands the username is "admin" and the password is "password." Refer to your manual for the exact defaults.

Step 5

Click on the "Change Password" or a similar option on the Main Menu, after you have logged in with the existing administrator existing network password. Type in the existing password and then type in your new password.

Click the "OK" or "Reset" button to complete the password change.

Tips

Press the reset button on the back of the router, to completely erase the password that you created for the administrator of the network. Then you will have to log in with the default password.

Sources and Citations

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  11. " Tips for creating strong passwords and passphrases." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2012. <http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Tips-for-creating-strong-passwords-and-passphrases>.
  12. " What is a password?." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2012. <http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/What-is-a-password>.
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By Adri Buckminster, published at 03/29/2012
   Rating: 4/5 (11 votes)
How To Change An Administrator Network Password. 4 of 5 based on 11 votes.

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