Computers Windows

Tips on Selecting a Windows Program

Introduction

The term operating system is firmly ingrained in the technical vocabulary of most computer users. Furthermore, the Microsoft Windows OS is the first brand that comes to mind when people are on the market for a new PC. One of the first specifications that PC manufacturers list in the product description when advertising new models is both the version and edition of the operating system, such as Windows Vista Business or Windows 7 Professional.

Where technical knowledge becomes decidedly more necessary, is when users need to obtain a supplemental program that isn't available in the original operating system. For example, Microsoft has included the WordPad program in Windows for many, many years, at least going back to Windows XP that was released in the early 2000s. However, this most basic of word processing programs does no suit the advanced needs of many users, especially for professionals who use these applications to create formal business letters and other types of business documents and literature.

Instead, Windows users must commonly seek out a third-party program, which may not always have failproof compatibility with the operating system. Unlike a piece of hardware or other electronics device, retailers are reluctant to refund software after it has been opened. Some companies fear that patrons may have installed the software, which means if the store refunds the product, the user still has access to the software files, virtually for free. If this has been your experience, or you have had similar issues around selecting programs for Windows, you might want to consider the following three tips for your future purposes.

Step 1

Select programs that compatibility with older and newer versions of Windows. For example, the current operating system on the market is Windows 7, but Microsoft is working on the release of Windows 8 at the time of the publication. If you are on the market for new programs that are compatible with Windows, seriously consider those that are compatible with Windows XP, Windows Vista AND Windows 7. The reasoning is that if the third-party software developer has kept up with the various versions of Windows for over a decade, then they will probably continue to do so in future releases.

When you upgrade to newer operating system, you want assurances that all of the third-party programs will continue to work when you reinstall those software files. You are basically at the mercy of the software developer, who will hopefully release a patch that helps their program have compatibility with the newer OS.

Step 2

Obtain programs from software developers that issue license numbers and product keys. Microsoft already uses product keys to confirm that users do not have fake or pirated software on a PC. they also use this number to verify that a PC is eligible for technical support.

Similarly, if you buy software which includes a license, as a type of account setup procedure, you may be able to get technical support when the software goes awry. Companies are reluctant to devote time and money to helping customers, if they cannot prove that the customer legally and rightfully obtained the software.

Step 3

Check to see if Microsoft develops a competing program before turning to third-party vendors. For example, although the native WordPad application does not suit the needs of many users, people can look at other word processors produced by Microsoft, such as Microsoft Word. Also, the Windows Media Player application is very versatile, capable of synchronizing with mobile phones as well as burning DVDs, eliminating the need for other third-party programs.

Tips

Back up your Windows programs for safekeeping.

Sources and Citations

  1. "32-bit and 64-bit Windows: frequently asked questions." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://Windows.microsoft.com/en-us/Windows7/32-bit-and-64-bit-Windows-frequently-asked-questionsandgt..
  2. "Change which programs Windows uses by default." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://Windows.microsoft.com/en-us/Windows7/Change-which-programs-Windows-uses-by-defaultandgt..
  3. "Find Windows-compatible programs." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://Windows.microsoft.com/en-U.S./Windows7/Find-Windows-compatible-programsandgt..
  4. "Installing programs: frequently asked questions." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://Windows.microsoft.com/en-U.S./Windows7/Installing-programs-frequently-asked-questionsandgt..
  5. "Make older programs run in this version of Windows." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://Windows.microsoft.com/en-U.S./Windows7/Make-older-programs-run-in-this-version-of-Windowsandgt..
  6. "Program Compatibility Assistant: frequently asked questions." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://Windows.microsoft.com/en-U.S./Windows7/Program-Compatibility-Assistant-frequently-asked-questionsandgt..
  7. "Remove unwanted programs from your computer." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://Windows.microsoft.com/en-U.S./Windows7/Remove-unwanted-programs-from-your-computerandgt..
  8. "Upgrading to Windows 7: frequently asked questions." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://Windows.microsoft.com/en-U.S./Windows7/upgrading-to-Windows-7-frequently-asked-questionsandgt..
  9. "Using programs." Microsoft Windows. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://Windows.microsoft.com/en-U.S./Windows7/Using-programsandgt..
  10. "Windows Live Essentials: Other Programs - Get started." Windows Live. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2012. andlt.http://explore.live.com/Windows-live-essentials-other-programs?T1=t2andgt..
By Adri Buckminster, published at 03/01/2012
   Rating: 4/5 (11 votes)
Tips on Selecting a Windows Program. 4 of 5 based on 11 votes.

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